javascript – Most efficient method to groupby on an array of objects

The Question :

576 people think this question is useful

What is the most efficient way to groupby objects in an array?

For example, given this array of objects:

[ 
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "5" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "10" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "15" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "20" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "25" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "30" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "35" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "40" }
]

I’m displaying this information in a table. I’d like to groupby different methods, but I want to sum the values.

I’m using Underscore.js for its groupby function, which is helpful, but doesn’t do the whole trick, because I don’t want them “split up” but “merged”, more like the SQL group by method.

What I’m looking for would be able to total specific values (if requested).

So if I did groupby Phase, I’d want to receive:

[
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Value: 50 },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Value: 130 }
]

And if I did groupy Phase / Step, I’d receive:

[
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Value: 15 },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Value: 35 },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Value: 55 },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Value: 75 }
]

Is there a helpful script for this, or should I stick to using Underscore.js, and then looping through the resulting object to do the totals myself?

The Question Comments :

The Answer 1

866 people think this answer is useful

If you want to avoid external libraries, you can concisely implement a vanilla version of groupBy() like so:

var groupBy = function(xs, key) {
  return xs.reduce(function(rv, x) {
    (rv[x[key]] = rv[x[key]] || []).push(x);
    return rv;
  }, {});
};

console.log(groupBy(['one', 'two', 'three'], 'length'));

// => {3: ["one", "two"], 5: ["three"]}

The Answer 2

275 people think this answer is useful

Using ES6 Map object:

/**
 * @description
 * Takes an Array<V>, and a grouping function,
 * and returns a Map of the array grouped by the grouping function.
 *
 * @param list An array of type V.
 * @param keyGetter A Function that takes the the Array type V as an input, and returns a value of type K.
 *                  K is generally intended to be a property key of V.
 *
 * @returns Map of the array grouped by the grouping function.
 */
//export function groupBy<K, V>(list: Array<V>, keyGetter: (input: V) => K): Map<K, Array<V>> {
//    const map = new Map<K, Array<V>>();
function groupBy(list, keyGetter) {
    const map = new Map();
    list.forEach((item) => {
         const key = keyGetter(item);
         const collection = map.get(key);
         if (!collection) {
             map.set(key, [item]);
         } else {
             collection.push(item);
         }
    });
    return map;
}


// example usage

const pets = [
    {type:"Dog", name:"Spot"},
    {type:"Cat", name:"Tiger"},
    {type:"Dog", name:"Rover"}, 
    {type:"Cat", name:"Leo"}
];
    
const grouped = groupBy(pets, pet => pet.type);
    
console.log(grouped.get("Dog")); // -> [{type:"Dog", name:"Spot"}, {type:"Dog", name:"Rover"}]
console.log(grouped.get("Cat")); // -> [{type:"Cat", name:"Tiger"}, {type:"Cat", name:"Leo"}]

const odd = Symbol();
const even = Symbol();
const numbers = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7];

const oddEven = groupBy(numbers, x => (x % 2 === 1 ? odd : even));
    
console.log(oddEven.get(odd)); // -> [1,3,5,7]
console.log(oddEven.get(even)); // -> [2,4,6]

About Map: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Map

The Answer 3

126 people think this answer is useful

with ES6:

const groupBy = (items, key) => items.reduce(
  (result, item) => ({
    ...result,
    [item[key]]: [
      ...(result[item[key]] || []),
      item,
    ],
  }), 
  {},
);

The Answer 4

61 people think this answer is useful

Although the linq answer is interesting, it’s also quite heavy-weight. My approach is somewhat different:

var DataGrouper = (function() {
    var has = function(obj, target) {
        return _.any(obj, function(value) {
            return _.isEqual(value, target);
        });
    };

    var keys = function(data, names) {
        return _.reduce(data, function(memo, item) {
            var key = _.pick(item, names);
            if (!has(memo, key)) {
                memo.push(key);
            }
            return memo;
        }, []);
    };

    var group = function(data, names) {
        var stems = keys(data, names);
        return _.map(stems, function(stem) {
            return {
                key: stem,
                vals:_.map(_.where(data, stem), function(item) {
                    return _.omit(item, names);
                })
            };
        });
    };

    group.register = function(name, converter) {
        return group[name] = function(data, names) {
            return _.map(group(data, names), converter);
        };
    };

    return group;
}());

DataGrouper.register("sum", function(item) {
    return _.extend({}, item.key, {Value: _.reduce(item.vals, function(memo, node) {
        return memo + Number(node.Value);
    }, 0)});
});

You can see it in action on JSBin.

I didn’t see anything in Underscore that does what has does, although I might be missing it. It’s much the same as _.contains, but uses _.isEqual rather than === for comparisons. Other than that, the rest of this is problem-specific, although with an attempt to be generic.

Now DataGrouper.sum(data, ["Phase"]) returns

[
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Value: 50},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Value: 130}
]

And DataGrouper.sum(data, ["Phase", "Step"]) returns

[
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Value: 15},
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Value: 35},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Value: 55},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Value: 75}
]


But sum is only one potential function here. You can register others as you like:

DataGrouper.register("max", function(item) {
    return _.extend({}, item.key, {Max: _.reduce(item.vals, function(memo, node) {
        return Math.max(memo, Number(node.Value));
    }, Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY)});
});

and now DataGrouper.max(data, ["Phase", "Step"]) will return

[
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Max: 10},
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Max: 20},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Max: 30},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Max: 40}
]

or if you registered this:

DataGrouper.register("tasks", function(item) {
    return _.extend({}, item.key, {Tasks: _.map(item.vals, function(item) {
      return item.Task + " (" + item.Value + ")";
    }).join(", ")});
});

then calling DataGrouper.tasks(data, ["Phase", "Step"]) will get you

[
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Tasks: "Task 1 (5), Task 2 (10)"},
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Tasks: "Task 1 (15), Task 2 (20)"},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Tasks: "Task 1 (25), Task 2 (30)"},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Tasks: "Task 1 (35), Task 2 (40)"}
]

DataGrouper itself is a function. You can call it with your data and a list of the properties you want to group by. It returns an array whose elements are object with two properties: key is the collection of grouped properties, vals is an array of objects containing the remaining properties not in the key. For example, DataGrouper(data, ["Phase", "Step"]) will yield:

[
    {
        "key": {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1"},
        "vals": [
            {Task: "Task 1", Value: "5"},
            {Task: "Task 2", Value: "10"}
        ]
    },
    {
        "key": {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2"},
        "vals": [
            {Task: "Task 1", Value: "15"}, 
            {Task: "Task 2", Value: "20"}
        ]
    },
    {
        "key": {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1"},
        "vals": [
            {Task: "Task 1", Value: "25"},
            {Task: "Task 2", Value: "30"}
        ]
    },
    {
        "key": {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2"},
        "vals": [
            {Task: "Task 1", Value: "35"}, 
            {Task: "Task 2", Value: "40"}
        ]
    }
]

DataGrouper.register accepts a function and creates a new function which accepts the initial data and the properties to group by. This new function then takes the output format as above and runs your function against each of them in turn, returning a new array. The function that’s generated is stored as a property of DataGrouper according to a name you supply and also returned if you just want a local reference.

Well that’s a lot of explanation. The code is reasonably straightforward, I hope!

The Answer 5

57 people think this answer is useful

I would check lodash groupBy it seems to do exactly what you are looking for. It is also quite lightweight and really simple.

Fiddle example: https://jsfiddle.net/r7szvt5k/

Provided that your array name is arr the groupBy with lodash is just:

import groupBy from 'lodash/groupBy';
// if you still use require:
// const groupBy = require('lodash/groupBy');

const a = groupBy(arr, function(n) {
  return n.Phase;
});
// a is your array grouped by Phase attribute

The Answer 6

49 people think this answer is useful

You can build an ES6 Map from array.reduce().

const groupedMap = initialArray.reduce(
    (entryMap, e) => entryMap.set(e.id, [...entryMap.get(e.id)||[], e]),
    new Map()
);

This has a few advantages over the other solutions:

  • It doesn’t require any libraries (unlike e.g. _.groupBy())
  • You get a JavaScript Map rather than an object (e.g. as returned by _.groupBy()). This has lots of benefits, including:
    • it remembers the order in which items were first added,
    • keys can be any type rather than just strings.
  • A Map is a more useful result that an array of arrays. But if you do want an array of arrays, you can then call Array.from(groupedMap.entries()) (for an array of [key, group array] pairs) or Array.from(groupedMap.values()) (for a simple array of arrays).
  • It’s quite flexible; often, whatever you were planning to do next with this map can be done directly as part of the reduction.

As an example of the last point, imagine I have an array of objects that I want to do a (shallow) merge on by id, like this:

const objsToMerge = [{id: 1, name: "Steve"}, {id: 2, name: "Alice"}, {id: 1, age: 20}];
// The following variable should be created automatically
const mergedArray = [{id: 1, name: "Steve", age: 20}, {id: 2, name: "Alice"}]

To do this, I would usually start by grouping by id, and then merging each of the resulting arrays. Instead, you can do the merge directly in the reduce():

const mergedArray = Array.from(
    objsToMerge.reduce(
        (entryMap, e) => entryMap.set(e.id, {...entryMap.get(e.id)||{}, ...e}),
        new Map()
    ).values()
);

The Answer 7

46 people think this answer is useful

This is probably more easily done with linq.js, which is intended to be a true implementation of LINQ in JavaScript (DEMO):

var linq = Enumerable.From(data);
var result =
    linq.GroupBy(function(x){ return x.Phase; })
        .Select(function(x){
          return {
            Phase: x.Key(),
            Value: x.Sum(function(y){ return y.Value|0; })
          };
        }).ToArray();

result:

[
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Value: 50 },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Value: 130 }
]

Or, more simply using the string-based selectors (DEMO):

linq.GroupBy("$.Phase", "",
    "k,e => { Phase:k, Value:e.Sum('$.Value|0') }").ToArray();

The Answer 8

24 people think this answer is useful
_.groupBy([{tipo: 'A' },{tipo: 'A'}, {tipo: 'B'}], 'tipo');
>> Object {A: Array[2], B: Array[1]}

From: http://underscorejs.org/#groupBy

The Answer 9

18 people think this answer is useful

You can do it with Alasql JavaScript library:

var data = [ { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "5" },
             { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "10" }];

var res = alasql('SELECT Phase, Step, SUM(CAST([Value] AS INT)) AS [Value] \
                  FROM ? GROUP BY Phase, Step',[data]);

Try this example at jsFiddle.

BTW: On large arrays (100000 records and more) Alasql faster tham Linq. See test at jsPref.

Comments:

  • Here I put Value in square brackets, because VALUE is a keyword in SQL
  • I have to use CAST() function to convert string Values to number type.

The Answer 10

18 people think this answer is useful
Array.prototype.groupBy = function(keyFunction) {
    var groups = {};
    this.forEach(function(el) {
        var key = keyFunction(el);
        if (key in groups == false) {
            groups[key] = [];
        }
        groups[key].push(el);
    });
    return Object.keys(groups).map(function(key) {
        return {
            key: key,
            values: groups[key]
        };
    });
};

The Answer 11

18 people think this answer is useful

MDN has this example in their Array.reduce() documentation.

// Grouping objects by a property
// https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/Reduce#Grouping_objects_by_a_property#Grouping_objects_by_a_property

var people = [
  { name: 'Alice', age: 21 },
  { name: 'Max', age: 20 },
  { name: 'Jane', age: 20 }
];

function groupBy(objectArray, property) {
  return objectArray.reduce(function (acc, obj) {
    var key = obj[property];
    if (!acc[key]) {
      acc[key] = [];
    }
    acc[key].push(obj);
    return acc;
  }, {});
}

var groupedPeople = groupBy(people, 'age');
// groupedPeople is:
// { 
//   20: [
//     { name: 'Max', age: 20 }, 
//     { name: 'Jane', age: 20 }
//   ], 
//   21: [{ name: 'Alice', age: 21 }] 
// }

The Answer 12

14 people think this answer is useful

Although the question have some answers and the answers look a bit over complicated, I suggest to use vanilla Javascript for group-by with a nested (if necessary) Map.

function groupBy(array, groups, valueKey) {
    var map = new Map;
    groups = [].concat(groups);
    return array.reduce((r, o) => {
        groups.reduce((m, k, i, { length }) => {
            var child;
            if (m.has(o[k])) return m.get(o[k]);
            if (i + 1 === length) {
                child = Object
                    .assign(...groups.map(k => ({ [k]: o[k] })), { [valueKey]: 0 });
                r.push(child);
            } else {
                child = new Map;
            }
            m.set(o[k], child);
            return child;
        }, map)[valueKey] += +o[valueKey];
        return r;
    }, [])
};

var data = [{ Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "5" }, { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "10" }, { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "15" }, { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "20" }, { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "25" }, { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "30" }, { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "35" }, { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "40" }];

console.log(groupBy(data, 'Phase', 'Value'));
console.log(groupBy(data, ['Phase', 'Step'], 'Value'));
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }

The Answer 13

9 people think this answer is useful

This solution takes any arbitrary function (not a key) so it’s more flexible than solutions above, and allows arrow functions, which are similar to lambda expressions used in LINQ:

Array.prototype.groupBy = function (funcProp) {
    return this.reduce(function (acc, val) {
        (acc[funcProp(val)] = acc[funcProp(val)] || []).push(val);
        return acc;
    }, {});
};

NOTE: whether you want to extend Array‘s prototype is up to you.

Example supported in most browsers:

[{a:1,b:"b"},{a:1,c:"c"},{a:2,d:"d"}].groupBy(function(c){return c.a;})

Example using arrow functions (ES6):

[{a:1,b:"b"},{a:1,c:"c"},{a:2,d:"d"}].groupBy(c=>c.a)

Both examples above return:

{
  "1": [{"a": 1, "b": "b"}, {"a": 1, "c": "c"}],
  "2": [{"a": 2, "d": "d"}]
}

The Answer 14

9 people think this answer is useful

Without mutations:

const groupBy = (xs, key) => xs.reduce((acc, x) => Object.assign({}, acc, {
  [x[key]]: (acc[x[key]] || []).concat(x)
}), {})

console.log(groupBy(['one', 'two', 'three'], 'length'));
// => {3: ["one", "two"], 5: ["three"]}

The Answer 15

9 people think this answer is useful

i’d like to suggest my approach. First, separate grouping and aggregating. Lets declare prototypical “group by” function. It takes another function to produce “hash” string for each array element to group by.

Array.prototype.groupBy = function(hash){
  var _hash = hash ? hash : function(o){return o;};

  var _map = {};
  var put = function(map, key, value){
    if (!map[_hash(key)]) {
        map[_hash(key)] = {};
        map[_hash(key)].group = [];
        map[_hash(key)].key = key;

    }
    map[_hash(key)].group.push(value); 
  }

  this.map(function(obj){
    put(_map, obj, obj);
  });

  return Object.keys(_map).map(function(key){
    return {key: _map[key].key, group: _map[key].group};
  });
}

when grouping is done you can aggregate data how you need, in your case

data.groupBy(function(o){return JSON.stringify({a: o.Phase, b: o.Step});})
    /* aggreagating */
    .map(function(el){ 
         var sum = el.group.reduce(
           function(l,c){
             return l + parseInt(c.Value);
           },
           0
         );
         el.key.Value = sum; 
         return el.key;
    });

in common it works. i have tested this code in chrome console. and feel free to improve and find mistakes 😉

The Answer 16

9 people think this answer is useful

Here’s a nasty, hard to read solution using ES6:

export default (arr, key) => 
  arr.reduce(
    (r, v, _, __, k = v[key]) => ((r[k] || (r[k] = [])).push(v), r),
    {}
  );

For those asking how does this even work, here’s an explanation:

  • In both => you have a free return

  • The Array.prototype.reduce function takes up to 4 parameters. That’s why a fifth parameter is being added so we can have a cheap variable declaration for the group (k) at the parameter declaration level by using a default value. (yes, this is sorcery)

  • If our current group doesn’t exist on the previous iteration, we create a new empty array ((r[k] || (r[k] = [])) This will evaluate to the leftmost expression, in other words, an existing array or an empty array, this is why there’s an immediate push after that expression, because either way you will get an array.

  • When there’s a return, the comma , operator will discard the leftmost value, returning the tweaked previous group for this scenario.

An easier to understand version that does the same is:

export default (array, key) => 
  array.reduce((previous, currentItem) => {
    const group = currentItem[key];
    if (!previous[group]) previous[group] = [];
    previous[group].push(currentItem);
    return previous;
  }, {});

Edit:

TS Version:

const groupBy = <T, K extends keyof any>(list: T[], getKey: (item: T) => K) =>
  list.reduce((previous, currentItem) => {
    const group = getKey(currentItem);
    if (!previous[group]) previous[group] = [];
    previous[group].push(currentItem);
    return previous;
  }, {} as Record<K, T[]>);

The Answer 17

9 people think this answer is useful

Checked answer — just shallow grouping. It’s pretty nice to understand reducing. Question also provide the problem of additional aggregate calculations.

Here is a REAL GROUP BY for Array of Objects by some field(s) with 1) calculated key name and 2) complete solution for cascading of grouping by providing the list of the desired keys and converting its unique values to root keys like SQL GROUP BY does.

const inputArray = [ 
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "5" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "10" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "15" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "20" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "25" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "30" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "35" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "40" }
];

var outObject = inputArray.reduce(function(a, e) {
  // GROUP BY estimated key (estKey), well, may be a just plain key
  // a -- Accumulator result object
  // e -- sequentally checked Element, the Element that is tested just at this itaration

  // new grouping name may be calculated, but must be based on real value of real field
  let estKey = (e['Phase']); 

  (a[estKey] ? a[estKey] : (a[estKey] = null || [])).push(e);
  return a;
}, {});

console.log(outObject);

Play with estKey — you may group by more then one field, add additional aggregations, calculations or other processing.

Also you can groups data recursively. For example initially group by Phase, then by Step field and so on. Additionally blow off the fat rest data.

const inputArray = [
{ Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "5" },
{ Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "10" },
{ Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "15" },
{ Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "20" },
{ Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "25" },
{ Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "30" },
{ Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "35" },
{ Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "40" }
  ];

/**
 * Small helper to get SHALLOW copy of obj WITHOUT prop
 */
const rmProp = (obj, prop) => ( (({[prop]:_, ...rest})=>rest)(obj) )

/**
 * Group Array by key. Root keys of a resulting array is value
 * of specified key.
 *
 * @param      {Array}   src     The source array
 * @param      {String}  key     The by key to group by
 * @return     {Object}          Object with grouped objects as values
 */
const grpBy = (src, key) => src.reduce((a, e) => (
  (a[e[key]] = a[e[key]] || []).push(rmProp(e, key)),  a
), {});

/**
 * Collapse array of object if it consists of only object with single value.
 * Replace it by the rest value.
 */
const blowObj = obj => Array.isArray(obj) &amp;&amp; obj.length === 1 &amp;&amp; Object.values(obj[0]).length === 1 ? Object.values(obj[0])[0] : obj;

/**
 * Recursive grouping with list of keys. `keyList` may be an array
 * of key names or comma separated list of key names whom UNIQUE values will
 * becomes the keys of the resulting object.
 */
const grpByReal = function (src, keyList) {
  const [key, ...rest] = Array.isArray(keyList) ? keyList : String(keyList).trim().split(/\s*,\s*/);
  const res = key ? grpBy(src, key) : [...src];
  if (rest.length) {
for (const k in res) {
  res[k] = grpByReal(res[k], rest)
}
  } else {
for (const k in res) {
  res[k] = blowObj(res[k])
}
  }
  return res;
}

console.log( JSON.stringify( grpByReal(inputArray, 'Phase, Step, Task'), null, 2 ) );

The Answer 18

6 people think this answer is useful
groupByArray(xs, key) {
    return xs.reduce(function (rv, x) {
        let v = key instanceof Function ? key(x) : x[key];
        let el = rv.find((r) => r &amp;&amp; r.key === v);
        if (el) {
            el.values.push(x);
        }
        else {
            rv.push({
                key: v,
                values: [x]
            });
        }
        return rv;
    }, []);
}

This one outputs array.

The Answer 19

6 people think this answer is useful

Imagine that you have something like this:

[{id:1, cat:'sedan'},{id:2, cat:'sport'},{id:3, cat:'sport'},{id:4, cat:'sedan'}]

By doing this: const categories = [...new Set(cars.map((car) => car.cat))]

You will get this: ['sedan','sport']

Explanation: 1. First, we are creating a new Set by passing an array. Because Set only allows unique values, all duplicates will be removed.

  1. Now the duplicates are gone, we’re going to convert it back to an array by using the spread operator …

Set Doc:https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Set Spread OperatorDoc: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Spread_syntax

The Answer 20

5 people think this answer is useful

Based on previous answers

const groupBy = (prop) => (xs) =>
  xs.reduce((rv, x) =>
    Object.assign(rv, {[x[prop]]: [...(rv[x[prop]] || []), x]}), {});

and it’s a little nicer to look at with object spread syntax, if your environment supports.

const groupBy = (prop) => (xs) =>
  xs.reduce((acc, x) => ({
    ...acc,
    [ x[ prop ] ]: [...( acc[ x[ prop ] ] || []), x],
  }), {});

Here, our reducer takes the partially-formed return value (starting with an empty object), and returns an object composed of the spread out members of the previous return value, along with a new member whose key is calculated from the current iteree’s value at prop and whose value is a list of all values for that prop along with the current value.

The Answer 21

5 people think this answer is useful

GroupBy one-liner, a ES2021 solution

const groupBy = (x,f)=>x.reduce((a,b)=>((a[f(b)]||=[]).push(b),a),{});

EXAMPLES

const groupBy = (x, f) => x.reduce((a, b) => ((a[f(b)] ||= []).push(b), a), {});
// f -> should must return string/number because it will be use as key in object

// for demo

groupBy([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9], v => (v % 2 ? "odd" : "even"));
// { odd: [1, 3, 5, 7, 9], even: [2, 4, 6, 8] };
const colors = [
  "Apricot",
  "Brown",
  "Burgundy",
  "Cerulean",
  "Peach",
  "Pear",
  "Red",
];

groupBy(colors, v => v[0]); // group by colors name first letter
// {
//   A: ["Apricot"],
//   B: ["Brown", "Burgundy"],
//   C: ["Cerulean"],
//   P: ["Peach", "Pear"],
//   R: ["Red"],
// };
groupBy(colors, v => v.length); // group by length of color names
// {
//   3: ["Red"],
//   4: ["Pear"],
//   5: ["Brown", "Peach"],
//   7: ["Apricot"],
//   8: ["Burgundy", "Cerulean"],
// }

const data = [
  { comment: "abc", forItem: 1, inModule: 1 },
  { comment: "pqr", forItem: 1, inModule: 1 },
  { comment: "klm", forItem: 1, inModule: 2 },
  { comment: "xyz", forItem: 1, inModule: 2 },
];

groupBy(data, v => v.inModule); // group by module
// {
//   1: [
//     { comment: "abc", forItem: 1, inModule: 1 },
//     { comment: "pqr", forItem: 1, inModule: 1 },
//   ],
//   2: [
//     { comment: "klm", forItem: 1, inModule: 2 },
//     { comment: "xyz", forItem: 1, inModule: 2 },
//   ],
// }

groupBy(data, x => x.forItem + "-" + x.inModule); // group by module with item
// {
//   "1-1": [
//     { comment: "abc", forItem: 1, inModule: 1 },
//     { comment: "pqr", forItem: 1, inModule: 1 },
//   ],
//   "2-1": [
//     { comment: "klm", forItem: 1, inModule: 2 },
//     { comment: "xyz", forItem: 1, inModule: 2 },
//   ],
// }

The Answer 22

3 people think this answer is useful

Array.prototype.groupBy = function (groupingKeyFn) {
    if (typeof groupingKeyFn !== 'function') {
        throw new Error("groupBy take a function as only parameter");
    }
    return this.reduce((result, item) => {
        let key = groupingKeyFn(item);
        if (!result[key])
            result[key] = [];
        result[key].push(item);
        return result;
    }, {});
}

var a = [
	{type: "video", name: "a"},
  {type: "image", name: "b"},
  {type: "video", name: "c"},
  {type: "blog", name: "d"},
  {type: "video", name: "e"},
]
console.log(a.groupBy((item) => item.type));
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

The Answer 23

2 people think this answer is useful

Lets generate a generic Array.prototype.groupBy() tool. Just for variety let’s use ES6 fanciness the spread operator for some Haskellesque pattern matching on a recursive approach. Also let’s make our Array.prototype.groupBy() to accept a callback which takes the item (e) the index (i) and the applied array (a) as arguments.

Array.prototype.groupBy = function(cb){
                            return function iterate([x,...xs], i = 0, r = [[],[]]){
                                     cb(x,i,[x,...xs]) ? (r[0].push(x), r)
                                                       : (r[1].push(x), r);
                                     return xs.length ? iterate(xs, ++i, r) : r;
                                   }(this);
                          };

var arr = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],
    res = arr.groupBy(e => e < 5);
console.log(res);

The Answer 24

2 people think this answer is useful

Just to add to Scott Sauyet’s answer, some people were asking in the comments how to use his function to groupby value1, value2, etc., instead of grouping just one value.

All it takes is to edit his sum function:

DataGrouper.register("sum", function(item) {
    return _.extend({}, item.key,
        {VALUE1: _.reduce(item.vals, function(memo, node) {
        return memo + Number(node.VALUE1);}, 0)},
        {VALUE2: _.reduce(item.vals, function(memo, node) {
        return memo + Number(node.VALUE2);}, 0)}
    );
});

leaving the main one (DataGrouper) unchanged:

var DataGrouper = (function() {
    var has = function(obj, target) {
        return _.any(obj, function(value) {
            return _.isEqual(value, target);
        });
    };

    var keys = function(data, names) {
        return _.reduce(data, function(memo, item) {
            var key = _.pick(item, names);
            if (!has(memo, key)) {
                memo.push(key);
            }
            return memo;
        }, []);
    };

    var group = function(data, names) {
        var stems = keys(data, names);
        return _.map(stems, function(stem) {
            return {
                key: stem,
                vals:_.map(_.where(data, stem), function(item) {
                    return _.omit(item, names);
                })
            };
        });
    };

    group.register = function(name, converter) {
        return group[name] = function(data, names) {
            return _.map(group(data, names), converter);
        };
    };

    return group;
}());

The Answer 25

2 people think this answer is useful

Ceasar’s answer is good, but works only for inner properties of the elements inside the array (length in case of string).

this implementation works more like: this link

const groupBy = function (arr, f) {
    return arr.reduce((out, val) => {
        let by = typeof f === 'function' ? '' + f(val) : val[f];
        (out[by] = out[by] || []).push(val);
        return out;
    }, {});
};

hope this helps…

The Answer 26

2 people think this answer is useful

From @mortb, @jmarceli answer and from this post,

I take the advantage of JSON.stringify() to be the identity for the PRIMITIVE VALUE multiple columns of group by.

Without third-party

function groupBy(list, keyGetter) {
    const map = new Map();
    list.forEach((item) => {
        const key = keyGetter(item);
        if (!map.has(key)) {
            map.set(key, [item]);
        } else {
            map.get(key).push(item);
        }
    });
    return map;
}

const pets = [
    {type:"Dog", age: 3, name:"Spot"},
    {type:"Cat", age: 3, name:"Tiger"},
    {type:"Dog", age: 4, name:"Rover"}, 
    {type:"Cat", age: 3, name:"Leo"}
];

const grouped = groupBy(pets,
pet => JSON.stringify({ type: pet.type, age: pet.age }));

console.log(grouped);

With Lodash third-party

const pets = [
    {type:"Dog", age: 3, name:"Spot"},
    {type:"Cat", age: 3, name:"Tiger"},
    {type:"Dog", age: 4, name:"Rover"}, 
    {type:"Cat", age: 3, name:"Leo"}
];

let rslt = _.groupBy(pets, pet => JSON.stringify(
 { type: pet.type, age: pet.age }));

console.log(rslt);

The Answer 27

2 people think this answer is useful

ES6 reduce based version version with the support for function iteratee.

Works just as expected if the iteratee function is not provided:

const data = [{id: 1, score: 2},{id: 1, score: 3},{id: 2, score: 2},{id: 2, score: 4}]

const group = (arr, k) => arr.reduce((r, c) => (r] = [...r] || [], c], r), {});

const groupBy = (arr, k, fn = () => true) => 
  arr.reduce((r, c) => (fn(c[k]) ? r] = [...r] || [], c] : null, r), {});

console.log(group(data, 'id'))     // grouping via `reduce`
console.log(groupBy(data, 'id'))   // same result if `fn` is omitted
console.log(groupBy(data, 'score', x => x > 2 )) // group with the iteratee

In the context of the OP question:

const data = [ { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "5" }, { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "10" }, { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "15" }, { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "20" }, { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "25" }, { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "30" }, { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "35" }, { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "40" } ]

const groupBy = (arr, k) => arr.reduce((r, c) => (r] = [...r] || [], c], r), {});
const groupWith = (arr, k, fn = () => true) => 
  arr.reduce((r, c) => (fn(c[k]) ? r] = [...r] || [], c] : null, r), {});

console.log(groupBy(data, 'Phase'))
console.log(groupWith(data, 'Value', x => x > 30 ))  // group by `Value` > 30

Another ES6 version which reverses the grouping and uses the values as keys and the keys as the grouped values:

const data = [{A: "1"}, {B: "10"}, {C: "10"}]

const groupKeys = arr => 
  arr.reduce((r,c) => (Object.keys(c).map(x => r] = [...r] || [], x]),r),{});

console.log(groupKeys(data))

Note: functions are posted in their short form (one line) for brevity and to relate just the idea. You can expand them and add additional error checking etc.

The Answer 28

2 people think this answer is useful

I would check declarative-js groupBy it seems to do exactly what you are looking for. It is also:

  • very performant (performance benchmark)
  • written in typescript so all typpings are included.
  • It is not enforcing to use 3rd party array-like objects.
import { Reducers } from 'declarative-js';
import groupBy = Reducers.groupBy;
import Map = Reducers.Map;

const data = [
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "5" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "10" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "15" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "20" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "25" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "30" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "35" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "40" }
];

data.reduce(groupBy(element=> element.Step), Map());
data.reduce(groupBy('Step'), Map());

The Answer 29

1 people think this answer is useful
let groupbyKeys = function(arr, ...keys) {
  let keysFieldName = keys.join();
  return arr.map(ele => {
    let keysField = {};
    keysField[keysFieldName] = keys.reduce((keyValue, key) => {
      return keyValue + ele[key]
    }, "");
    return Object.assign({}, ele, keysField);
  }).reduce((groups, ele) => {
    (groups[ele[keysFieldName]] = groups[ele[keysFieldName]] || [])
      .push([ele].map(e => {
        if (keys.length > 1) {
          delete e[keysFieldName];
        }
        return e;
    })[0]);
    return groups;
  }, {});
};

console.log(groupbyKeys(array, 'Phase'));
console.log(groupbyKeys(array, 'Phase', 'Step'));
console.log(groupbyKeys(array, 'Phase', 'Step', 'Task'));

The Answer 30

1 people think this answer is useful

Here is a ES6 version that won’t break on null members

function groupBy (arr, key) {
  return (arr || []).reduce((acc, x = {}) => ({
    ...acc,
    [x[key]]: [...acc[x[key]] || [], x]
  }), {})
}

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