grant remote access of MySQL database from any IP address

The Question :

295 people think this question is useful

I am aware of this command:

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES
ON database.*
TO 'user'@'yourremotehost'
IDENTIFIED BY 'newpassword';

But then it only allows me to grant a particular IP address to access this remote MySQL database. What if I want it so that any remote host can access this MySQL database? How do I do that? Basically I am making this database public so everyone can access it.

The Question Comments :

The Answer 1

287 people think this answer is useful
TO 'user'@'%'

% is a wildcard – you can also do '%.domain.com' or '%.123.123.123' and things like that if you need.

The Answer 2

179 people think this answer is useful

Enable Remote Access (Grant) Home / Tutorials / Mysql / Enable Remote Access (Grant) If you try to connect to your mysql server from remote machine, and run into error like below, this article is for you.

ERROR 1130 (HY000): Host ‘1.2.3.4’ is not allowed to connect to this MySQL server

Change mysql config

Start with editing mysql config file

vim /etc/mysql/my.cnf

Comment out following lines.

#bind-address           = 127.0.0.1
#skip-networking

If you do not find skip-networking line, add it and comment out it.

Restart mysql server.

~ /etc/init.d/mysql restart

Change GRANT privilege

You may be surprised to see even after above change you are not getting remote access or getting access but not able to all databases.

By default, mysql username and password you are using is allowed to access mysql-server locally. So need to update privilege.

Run a command like below to access from all machines. (Replace USERNAME and PASSWORD by your credentials.)

mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'USERNAME'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'PASSWORD' WITH GRANT OPTION;

Run a command like below to give access from specific IP. (Replace USERNAME and PASSWORD by your credentials.)

mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'USERNAME'@'1.2.3.4' IDENTIFIED BY 'PASSWORD' WITH GRANT OPTION;

You can replace 1.2.3.4 with your IP. You can run above command many times to GRANT access from multiple IPs.

You can also specify a separate USERNAME & PASSWORD for remote access.

You can check final outcome by:

SELECT * from information_schema.user_privileges where grantee like "'USERNAME'%";

Finally, you may also need to run:

mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Test Connection

From terminal/command-line:

mysql -h HOST -u USERNAME -pPASSWORD

If you get a mysql shell, don’t forget to run show databases; to check if you have right privileges from remote machines.

Bonus-Tip: Revoke Access

If you accidentally grant access to a user, then better have revoking option handy.

Following will revoke all options for USERNAME from all machines:

mysql> REVOKE ALL PRIVILEGES, GRANT OPTION FROM 'USERNAME'@'%';
Following will revoke all options for USERNAME from particular IP:

mysql> REVOKE ALL PRIVILEGES, GRANT OPTION FROM 'USERNAME'@'1.2.3.4';
Its better to check information_schema.user_privileges table after running REVOKE command.

If you see USAGE privilege after running REVOKE command, its fine. It is as good as no privilege at all. I am not sure if it can be revoked.

The Answer 3

37 people think this answer is useful

Assuming that the above step is completed and MySql port 3306 is free to be accessed remotely; Don’t forget to bind the public ip address in the mysql config file.

For example on my ubuntu server:

#nano /etc/mysql/my.cnf

In the file, search for the [mysqld] section block and add the new bind address, in this example it is 192.168.0.116. It would look something like this

......    
.....    
# Instead of skip-networking the default is now to listen only on
# localhost which is more compatible and is not less secure.

bind-address        = 127.0.0.1    
bind-address        = 192.168.0.116

.....    
......

you can remove th localhost(127.0.0.1) binding if you choose, but then you have to specifically give an IP address to access the server on the local machine.

Then the last step is to restart the MySql server (on ubuntu)

stop mysql

start mysql

or #/etc/init.d/mysql restart for other systems

Now the MySQL database can be accessed remotely by:

mysql -u username -h 192.168.0.116 -p

The Answer 4

32 people think this answer is useful

To be able to connect with your user from any IP address, do the following:

Allow mysql server to accept remote connections. For this open mysqld.conf file:

sudo gedit /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf

Search for the line starting with “bind-address” and set it’s value to 0.0.0.0

bind-address                    = 0.0.0.0

and finally save the file.

Note: If you’re running MySQL 8+, the bind-address directive will not be in the mysqld.cnf file by default. In this case, add the directive to the bottom of the file /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf.

Now restart the mysql server, either with systemd or use the older service command. This depends on your operating system:

sudo systemctl restart mysql # for ubuntu    
sudo systemctl restart mysqld.service # for debian

Finally, mysql server is now able to accept remote connections.

Now we need to create a user and grant it permission, so we can be able to login with this user remotely.

Connect to MySQL database as root, or any other user with root privilege.

mysql -u root -p

now create desired user in both localhost and ‘%’ wildcard and grant permissions on all DB’s as such .

CREATE USER 'myuser'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'mypass';
CREATE USER 'myuser'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'mypass';

Then,

GRANT ALL ON *.* TO 'myuser'@'localhost';
GRANT ALL ON *.* TO 'myuser'@'%';

And finally don’t forget to flush privileges

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Note: If you’ve configured a firewall on your database server, you will also need to open port 3306 MySQL’s default port to allow traffic to MySQL.

Hope this helps 😉

The Answer 5

29 people think this answer is useful

Config file changes are required to enable connections via localhost.

To connect through remote IPs, Login as a “root” user and run the below queries in mysql.

CREATE USER 'username'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'username'@'localhost' WITH GRANT OPTION;

CREATE USER 'username'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'username'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

This will create a new user that is accessible on localhost as well as from remote IPs.

Also comment the below line from your my.cnf file located in /etc/mysql/my.cnf

bind-address = 127.0.0.1

Restart your mysql using

sudo service mysql restart

Now you should be able to connect remotely to your mysql.

The Answer 6

26 people think this answer is useful

For anyone who fumbled with this, here is how I got to grant the privileges, hope it helps someone

GRANT ALL ON yourdatabasename.* TO root@'%' IDENTIFIED BY
'yourRootPassword';

As noted % is a wildcard and this will allow any IP address to connect to your database. The assumption I make here is when you connect you’ll have a user named root (which is the default though). Feed in the root password and you are good to go. Note that I have no single quotes (') around the user root.

The Answer 7

22 people think this answer is useful

Use this command:

GRANT ALL ON yourdatabasename.* TO root@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'yourRootPassword';

Then:

FLUSH PRIVILEGES; 

Then comment out the below line in file “/etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf” (is required!):

bind-address = 127.0.0.1 

Works for me!

The Answer 8

17 people think this answer is useful

Run the following:

$ mysql -u root -p      
mysql> GRANT ALL ON *.* to root@'ipaddress' IDENTIFIED BY 'mysql root password';     
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;     
mysql> exit

Then attempt a connection from the IP address you specified:

mysql -h address-of-remove-server -u root -p   

You should be able to connect.

The Answer 9

15 people think this answer is useful

You can slove the problem of MariaDB via this command:

Note:

GRANT ALL ON *.* to root@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'mysql root password';

% is a wildcard. In this case, it refers to all IP addresses.

The Answer 10

8 people think this answer is useful
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'user'@'ipadress'

The Answer 11

7 people think this answer is useful

To remotely access database Mysql server 8:

CREATE USER 'root'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'Pswword@123';

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'root'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

The Answer 12

5 people think this answer is useful
  • START MYSQL using admin user
    • mysql -u admin-user -p (ENTER PASSWORD ON PROMPT)
  • Create a new user:
    • CREATE USER ‘newuser’@’%’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘password’; (% -> anyhost)
  • Grant Privileges:
    • GRANT SELECT,DELETE,INSERT,UPDATE ON db_name.* TO ‘newuser’@’%’;
    • FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

If you are running EC2 instance don’t forget to add the inbound rules in security group with MYSQL/Aurura.

The Answer 13

5 people think this answer is useful

Edit File:

/etc/mysql/percona-server.cnf

Append below code in file.

[mysqld] bind-address = 0.0.0.0

Create user for remote access.

$ mysql -u root -p      
mysql> GRANT ALL ON *.* to snippetbucketdotcom@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'tejastank';   
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;    
mysql> exit

All linux server works,

For MSWin c:\ Find insatallation location \ file path

The Answer 14

3 people think this answer is useful

Just create the user to some database like

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON <database_name>.* TO '<username>'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY '<password>'

Then go to

sudo nano /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf and change the line bind-address = 127.0.0.1 to bind-address = 0.0.0.0

After that you may connect to that database from any IP.

The Answer 15

3 people think this answer is useful

Open your mysql console and execute the following command (enter your database name,username and password):

GRANT ALL ON yourdatabasename.* TO admin@’%’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘yourRootPassword’;

Then Execute:

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Open command line and open the file /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf using any editor with root privileges.

For example:

sudo nano /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf

Then comment out the below line:

bind-address = 127.0.0.1

Restart mysql to reflect the changes using command:

sudo service mysql restart

Enjoy 😉

The Answer 16

2 people think this answer is useful

You need to change the mysql config file:

Start with editing mysql config file

vim /etc/mysql/my.cnf

add:

bind-address = 0.0.0.0

The Answer 17

1 people think this answer is useful

what worked for on Ubuntu is granting all privileges to the user:

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'root'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'yourpassword' WITH GRANT OPTION;

and setting the bind address in /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf:

bind-address            = 0.0.0.0

then restarting the mysql daemon:

service mysql restart

The Answer 18

0 people think this answer is useful

In website panels like cPanel you may add a single % (percentage sign) in allowed hostnames to access your MySQL database.

By adding a single % you can access your database from any IP or website even from desktop applications.

The Answer 19

0 people think this answer is useful

For example in my CentOS

sudo gedit /etc/mysql/my.cnf

comment out the following lines

#bind-address = 127.0.0.1

then

sudo service mysqld restart

The Answer 20

0 people think this answer is useful

If you want to grant remote access of your database from any IP address, run the mysql command and after that run the following command.

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.*
TO 'root'@'%' 
IDENTIFIED BY 'password' 
WITH GRANT OPTION;

The Answer 21

-7 people think this answer is useful

You can disable all security by editing /etc/my.cnf:

skip-grant-tables

Tags:,

Add a Comment