mysql – mysqld_safe Directory ‘/var/run/mysqld’ for UNIX socket file don’t exists

The Question :

205 people think this question is useful

While starting mysql server 5.7.17 using mysqld_safe, following error occcours.

2017-02-10T17:05:44.870970Z mysqld_safe Logging to '/var/log/mysql/error.log'.
2017-02-10T17:05:44.872874Z mysqld_safe Logging to '/var/log/mysql/error.log'.
2017-02-10T17:05:44.874547Z mysqld_safe Directory '/var/run/mysqld' for UNIX socket file don't exists.

How to fix it ?

The Question Comments :

The Answer 1

553 people think this answer is useful

It seems odd that this directory was not created at install – have you manually changed the path of the socket file in the my.cfg?

Have you tried simply creating this directory yourself, and restarting the service?

mkdir -p /var/run/mysqld
chown mysql:mysql /var/run/mysqld

The Answer 2

84 people think this answer is useful

When I used the code mysqld_safe --skip-grant-tables & but I get the error:

mysqld_safe Directory ‘/var/run/mysqld’ for UNIX socket file don’t exists.

$ systemctl stop  mysql.service
$ ps -eaf|grep mysql
$ mysqld_safe --skip-grant-tables &

I solved:

$ mkdir -p /var/run/mysqld
$ chown mysql:mysql /var/run/mysqld

Now I use the same code mysqld_safe --skip-grant-tables & and get

mysqld_safe Starting mysqld daemon with databases from /var/lib/mysql

If I use $ mysql -u root I’ll get :

Server version: 5.7.18-0ubuntu0.16.04.1 (Ubuntu)

Copyright (c) 2000, 2017, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Type ‘help;’ or ‘\h’ for help. Type ‘\c’ to clear the current input statement.

mysql>

Now time to change password:

mysql> use mysql
mysql> describe user;

Reading table information for completion of table and column names You can turn off this feature to get a quicker startup with -A

Database changed

mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
mysql> SET PASSWORD FOR root@'localhost' = PASSWORD('newpwd');

or If you have a mysql root account that can connect from everywhere, you should also do:

UPDATE mysql.user SET Password=PASSWORD('newpwd') WHERE User='root';

Alternate Method:

   USE mysql
   UPDATE user SET Password = PASSWORD('newpwd')
   WHERE Host = 'localhost' AND User = 'root';

And if you have a root account that can access from everywhere:

 USE mysql
 UPDATE user SET Password = PASSWORD('newpwd')
 WHERE Host = '%' AND User = 'root';`enter code here

now need to quit from mysql and stop/start

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
sudo /etc/init.d/mysql stop
sudo /etc/init.d/mysql start

now again ` mysql -u root -p’ and use the new password to get

mysql>

The Answer 3

8 people think this answer is useful

Work for me in CentOS:

$ service mysql stop
$ mysqld --skip-grant-tables &
$ mysql -u root mysql

mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
mysql> ALTER USER 'root'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'new_password';

$ service mysql restart

The Answer 4

0 people think this answer is useful

You may try the following if your database does not have any data OR you have another away to restore that data. You will need to know the Ubuntu server root password but not the mysql root password.

It is highly probably that many of us have installed “mysql_secure_installation” as this is a best practice. Navigate to bin directory where mysql_secure_installation exist. It can be found in the /bin directory on Ubuntu systems. By rerunning the installer, you will be prompted about whether to change root database password.

Add a Comment