asp.net – Call a stored procedure with parameter in c#

The Question :

143 people think this question is useful

I’m able to delete, insert and update in my program and I try to do an insert by calling a created stored procedure from my database.

This button insert I made works well.

private void btnAdd_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
        SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con);
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("Command String", con);
        
        da.InsertCommand = new SqlCommand("INSERT INTO tblContacts VALUES (@FirstName, @LastName)", con);
        da.InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtFirstName.Text;
        da.InsertCommand.Parameters.Add("@LastName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtLastName.Text;

        con.Open();
        da.InsertCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
        con.Close();

        dt.Clear();
        da.Fill(dt);
    } 

This is the start of the button that calls the procedure named sp_Add_contact to add a contact. The two parameters for sp_Add_contact(@FirstName,@LastName). I searched on google for some good examples but found nothing interesting.

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
        SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con);
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("Command String", con);
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

        ???
        
        con.Open();
        da. ???.ExecuteNonQuery();
        con.Close();

        dt.Clear();
        da.Fill(dt);
    }

The Question Comments :
  • Just an extra bit of info – you should not name your application stored procedures with an sp_ prefix, like above with sp_Add_contact. the sp_ prefix is a system stored proc naming convention, that, when SQL sees it, will search through all system stored procedures first before any application or user space stored procs. As a matter of performance, if you care about that in your application, the sp_ prefix will degrade your response times.

The Answer 1

272 people think this answer is useful

It’s pretty much the same as running a query. In your original code you are creating a command object, putting it in the cmd variable, and never use it. Here, however, you will use that instead of da.InsertCommand.

Also, use a using for all disposable objects, so that you are sure that they are disposed properly:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con)) {
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_Add_contact", con)) {
      cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

      cmd.Parameters.Add("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtFirstName.Text;
      cmd.Parameters.Add("@LastName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtLastName.Text;

      con.Open();
      cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
  }
}

The Answer 2

40 people think this answer is useful

You have to add parameters since it is needed for the SP to execute

using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con))
{
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("SP_ADD", con))
    {
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@FirstName", txtfirstname.Text);
        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@LastName", txtlastname.Text);
        con.Open();
        cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }            
}

The Answer 3

14 people think this answer is useful

cmd.Parameters.Add(String parameterName, Object value) is deprecated now. Instead use cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(String parameterName, Object value)

Add(String parameterName, Object value) has been deprecated. Use AddWithValue(String parameterName, Object value)

There is no difference in terms of functionality. The reason they deprecated the cmd.Parameters.Add(String parameterName, Object value) in favor of AddWithValue(String parameterName, Object value) is to give more clarity. Here is the MSDN reference for the same

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
  using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(dc.Con)) {
    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_Add_contact", con)) {
      cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

      cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtFirstName.Text;
      cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@LastName", SqlDbType.VarChar).Value = txtLastName.Text;

      con.Open();
      cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
  }
}

The Answer 4

3 people think this answer is useful

As an alternative, I have a library that makes it easy to work with procs: https://www.nuget.org/packages/SprocMapper/

SqlServerAccess sqlAccess = new SqlServerAccess("your connection string");
    sqlAccess.Procedure()
         .AddSqlParameter("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar, txtFirstName.Text)
         .AddSqlParameter("@FirstName", SqlDbType.VarChar, txtLastName.Text)
         .ExecuteNonQuery("StoredProcedureName");

The Answer 5

1 people think this answer is useful

The .NET Data Providers consist of a number of classes used to connect to a data source, execute commands, and return recordsets. The Command Object in ADO.NET provides a number of Execute methods that can be used to perform the SQL queries in a variety of fashions.

A stored procedure is a pre-compiled executable object that contains one or more SQL statements. In many cases stored procedures accept input parameters and return multiple values . Parameter values can be supplied if a stored procedure is written to accept them. A sample stored procedure with accepting input parameter is given below :

  CREATE PROCEDURE SPCOUNTRY
  @COUNTRY VARCHAR(20)
  AS
  SELECT PUB_NAME FROM publishers WHERE COUNTRY = @COUNTRY
  GO

The above stored procedure is accepting a country name (@COUNTRY VARCHAR(20)) as parameter and return all the publishers from the input country. Once the CommandType is set to StoredProcedure, you can use the Parameters collection to define parameters.

  command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
  param = new SqlParameter("@COUNTRY", "Germany");
  param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
  param.DbType = DbType.String;
  command.Parameters.Add(param);

The above code passing country parameter to the stored procedure from C# application.

using System;
using System.Data;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SqlClient;

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string connetionString = null;
            SqlConnection connection ;
            SqlDataAdapter adapter ;
            SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand();
            SqlParameter param ;
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();

            int i = 0;

            connetionString = "Data Source=servername;Initial Catalog=PUBS;User ID=sa;Password=yourpassword";
            connection = new SqlConnection(connetionString);

            connection.Open();
            command.Connection = connection;
            command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            command.CommandText = "SPCOUNTRY";

            param = new SqlParameter("@COUNTRY", "Germany");
            param.Direction = ParameterDirection.Input;
            param.DbType = DbType.String;
            command.Parameters.Add(param);

            adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(command);
            adapter.Fill(ds);

            for (i = 0; i <= ds.Tables[0].Rows.Count - 1; i++)
            {
                MessageBox.Show (ds.Tables[0].Rows[i][0].ToString ());
            }

            connection.Close();
        }
    }
}

The Answer 6

0 people think this answer is useful
public void myfunction(){
        try
        {
            sqlcon.Open();
            SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("sp_laba", sqlcon);
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }
        finally
        {
            sqlcon.Close();
        }
}

The Answer 7

0 people think this answer is useful

Here is my technique I’d like to share. Works well so long as your clr property types are sql equivalent types eg. bool -> bit, long -> bigint, string -> nchar/char/varchar/nvarchar, decimal -> money

public void SaveTransaction(Transaction transaction) 
{
    using (var con = new SqlConnection(ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["ConString"].ConnectionString))
    {
        using (var cmd = new SqlCommand("spAddTransaction", con))
        {
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            foreach (var prop in transaction.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance))
                cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@" + prop.Name, prop.GetValue(transaction, null));
            con.Open();
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }
    }
}

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